Police use breathalyzers to ensure public safety on the road, but breath alcohol testing is also common for those covered under DOT regulations for mandatory drug/alcohol screening, as well
as post-accident or reasonable suspicion testing or for anyone performing a safety-sensitive job. PEth alcohol testing is used to test for alcohol in the body as well, but using blood rather than breath. Want to know more about these tests at Oris? Read on!
alcohol PEth test dry blood spot
 

BAT - Breath Alcohol Test

Is blood drawn for this test?


Yes, by a licensed phlebotomist.




What do I need to bring with me?


Identification in the form of a company ID with photo, driver’s license or passport, and a Custody and Control Form if necessary.




How long does the test take?


The entire PEth test process usually takes about 30-45 minutes, including paperwork.




How long does it take to get the results?


Oris uses United States Drug Testing Laboratory (USDTL), and the results average 3-5 days.




How is this test conducted?


A licensed phlebotomist will collect the sample via venipuncture (needle and syringe). The sample will be sealed with tamper-evident tape, packaged in the appropriate pouch, and sent with all relevant custody and control paperwork to the lab.




What are EtG and EtS?


EtG is short for ethyl glucuronide - or ethanol, and EtS is ethyl sulfate. Both are direct biomarkers for alcohol, though EtS is considered the more minor of the two. The test for EtG is extremely accurate, has a fairly long window of detection, and doesn’t give a false positive in the case of fermentation, but only giving a positive result when alcohol is consumed. EtG (ethanol) is the intoxicating ingredient in wine, beer, and liquor and is quickly absorbed in the blood. It then affects all major organs in your body, including the heart and brain. About 90% of alcohol ingested will be metabolized by the liver, turning alcohol into acetaldehyde which is recognized as toxic by the body. There is a correlation here: The liver processes about one serving of alcohol/hour (or 12 oz beer, 4-5 oz wine or 1.25 oz of 80 proof liquor), so if a person drinks more than one serving of alcohol/hour, more of that alcohol will enter the bloodstream.




What is the science behind this test?


The process, specifically, is gas chromatography, which separates ethanol from other alcohols.





 

PEth Test - Blood Spot

What does "PEth" mean?


PEth stands for "Phosphatidylethanol." Phosphatidylethanol is an abnormal phospholipid formed only in the presence of ethanol by an enzyme known as phospholipase D and it is stored in the red blood cell membrane. Because it is only found in the presence of ethanol - or alcohol - detection of PEth is considered a direct biomarker in determining alcohol exposure.




What do I need to bring with me?


Identification in the form of a company ID with photo, driver’s license or passport, and a Custody and Control Form if necessary.




How long does the test take?


The entire PEth test process usually takes about 30 minutes.




How long does it take to get the results?


Oris uses United States Drug Testing Laboratory (USDTL), and the results average 3-5 days.




What is a PEth test?


PEth is also known as a "dried blood spot" test, and is done to detect the presence of alcohol consumption during the 2-3 week period prior to testing, so is more commonly known as a mid- to long-term biomarker for alcohol. It is considered a highly sensitive and extremely effective way to test for chronic alcohol abuse. PEth tests are best used to determine binges or chronic alcohol use rather than light or casual drinking. When PEth is detected, it is with a high degree of confidence that alcohol has been consumed, and research indicates that a PEth test can differentiate between incidental exposure (e.g. hand sanitizer) and intentional alcohol consumption. PEth testing is great for determining a pattern of consumption... or overconsumption.




How is a PEth test conducted?


The tip of the finger is cleaned with isopropyl alcohol; once dry, the donor uses a sterile lancet to prick the finger. On the collection test paper, 1 spot will "wick" in each section, for a total of 5 blood spots collected. This is then packaged and sent to the lab for testing.





 

Alcohol (EtG) Blood Test

Is blood drawn for this test?


Yes, by a licensed phlebotomist.




What do I need to bring with me?


Identification in the form of a company ID with photo, driver’s license or passport, and a Custody and Control Form if necessary.




How long does the test take?


The entire PEth test process usually takes about 30-45 minutes, including paperwork.




How long does it take to get the results?


Oris uses United States Drug Testing Laboratory (USDTL), and the results average 3-5 days.




How is this test conducted?


A licensed phlebotomist will collect the sample via venipuncture (needle and syringe). The sample will be sealed with tamper-evident tape, packaged in the appropriate pouch, and sent with all relevant custody and control paperwork to the lab.




What are EtG and EtS?


EtG is short for ethyl glucuronide - or ethanol, and EtS is ethyl sulfate. Both are direct biomarkers for alcohol, though EtS is considered the more minor of the two. The test for EtG is extremely accurate, has a fairly long window of detection, and doesn’t give a false positive in the case of fermentation, but only giving a positive result when alcohol is consumed. EtG (ethanol) is the intoxicating ingredient in wine, beer, and liquor and is quickly absorbed in the blood. It then affects all major organs in your body, including the heart and brain. About 90% of alcohol ingested will be metabolized by the liver, turning alcohol into acetaldehyde which is recognized as toxic by the body. There is a correlation here: The liver processes about one serving of alcohol/hour (or 12 oz beer, 4-5 oz wine or 1.25 oz of 80 proof liquor), so if a person drinks more than one serving of alcohol/hour, more of that alcohol will enter the bloodstream.




What is the science behind this test?


The process, specifically, is gas chromatography, which separates ethanol from other alcohols.